CB Radio Lingo

A Few Tips

  1. It’s helpful to say “over” when you’re done talking. It’s not absolutely necessary, but it does help keep the clarity in your conversations.
  2. Mention the person’s name (or call sign if you’re one of those weirdos) when you speak. This helps others on your channel know who your message is for. CB radios don’t have an equalizer, so everyone’s voice sounds incredibly similar.
  3. Make sure you go over these terms with your crew; don’t expect everyone to be as well-versed as a genius who uses LinemanBible.com (that’s you, stupid).
  4. Wait about a half-second after pushing the button to speak. If you speak immediatly, you risk your first word(s) being cut off.
  5. Try to slow down a bit. Most people are in the habbit of speaking quickly, but that doesn’t bode well on the radio.

Paging Someone / Getting Their Attention

I worked with a few guys from Mississippi who would say, “How ’bout cha, [name]?” as a way to get someone’s attention. What in the incestual hillbilly version of ebonics is that crap? Are you asking how I’m doing? Who let you out of the house?
The proper way to call for someone’s attention over the radio is, “Come in, [name].” or, as the military uses, “[name] this is [your name]”.
The person being paged will respond, “Come on, [name].” or “Go ahead, [name].”

Alphabet

Individual letters are incredibly difficult to understand on the radio, so the NATO Alphabet is a very useful tool.

AALFA
BBRAVO
CCHARLIE
DDELTA
EECHO
FFOXTROT
GGOLF
HHOTEL
IINDIA
JJULIETT
KKILO
LLIMA (LEE mah)
MMIKE
NNOVEMBER
OOSCAR
PPAPA
QQUEBEC
RROMEO
SSIERRA
TTANGO
UUNIFORM
VVICTOR
WWHISKEY
XX-RAY
YYANKEE
ZZULU

Numbers are also included in the NATO, but the only one that’s different is 9 (niner). This is because of its similarity to 5.

The “10 Codes”

The 10 Codes are number codes with a universally agreed-upon meaning. They are a bit of a time-saver if your receiving end understands them…good luck with that. What’s listed below isn’t all of the 10 codes.

10-1Bad Signal / I can’t hear you
10-2Clear Signal
10-3Shut up / Radio Silence
10-4Affirmative / OK
10-6I’m Busy / Hold on
10-9Repeat message / “Come back”
10-10“Over” / Done speaking
10-13Weather (What’s the 10-13?)
10-17Urgent business
10-20Identifying location (This is where “What’s your 20?” comes from)
10-27I’m moving to channel [insert channel]
10-33Emergency traffic at this station
10-36Current time
10-38Ambulance needed at [insert location]
10-45If you can hear me, let me know
10-62Unable to copy; please use phone
10-99Mission completed
10-100Bathroom break
10-200Police needed at [insert location]

And More…

I don’t want to write an excerpt for every single phrase, so here you go:

  • Copy / Roger = Understood / I understand
  • 42 = Yes (not a 10 Code)
  • Wilco = “Will comply” / “Yes sir, Mr. Foreman, sir!”
  • Come Back / Say Again = “Repeat that”
  • Bear / Big Bear / Smokey = Law enforcement
  • Gator / Aligator = Piece of blown-out tire on the road
  • Acknowledge = Let me know you heard me
  • Read Back = Repeat what I just told you verbatim
  • More To Follow = I have more to say in a moment
  • Over = I’m done speaking / It’s your turn to speak
  • Out = I’m done with this conversation
  • Relay To [name] = Repeat this message to the person designated

Example

Here’s a foreman speaking to his bucket boy:

“Doofus, this is Crybaby. Over.”
“Go ahead, Crybaby. Over.”
“Why is the new guy digging a hole with a bolt? Over.”
“He started questioning the way I was doing things and I’m too insecure to handle it, so I told him to dig a hole and fill it back up. Over.”
“10-4. Over and out.”

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Copyright © 2021 LinemanBible.com |
A Wilcox Web Designs, LLC Company